Taxes may discourage purchase of sugared & high-fat beverages in US households with young children

A new study by Christopher N. Ford, PhD, found that a tax on beverages high in sugar and/or fat may be associated with favorable shifts in food and beverage purchases among households in the United States with a preschool child.

A press release by the Gillings School of Global Public Health featured Ford’s research:

Researchers at The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill’s Gillings School of Global Public Health determined that taxing high-calorie beverages may help persuade families of preschool children in the U.S. to buy fewer such beverages and perhaps to buy fewer high-calorie foods, as well. The study, “Targeted Beverage Taxes Influence Food and Beverage Purchases Among Households with Preschool Children,” used household food and beverage purchase data from the 2009 – 2012 Nielsen Homescan Panel, and was published online June 10 in the Journal of Nutrition.

Read the full press release here.

Read the full research article here.

Chris Ford, PhD, is a Gillings School Department of Nutrition and UNCFRP alumnus, and is now a postdoctoral fellow at The University of Texas’ M.D. Anderson Cancer Center.

About Bridget Hollingsworth

Carolina Population Center
This entry was posted in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink.

One Response to Taxes may discourage purchase of sugared & high-fat beverages in US households with young children

  1. Scott says:

    It has worked to an extent with tobacco. Findings show that every 10% increase in tobacco costs results in a 4% decrease in use. There are obviously a huge variety of factors though; socioeconomic status, ethnicity, region of the country, and others. But as a whole, increasing taxes generally reduces consumption.

Leave a Reply to Scott Cancel reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *